Saturated Fat, Cholesterol & Carbohydrates all over the World & Updates

Hello again! It’s been a long 5 months since TheFatNurse’s last post! I’ve been finishing up the last semester of my Family Nurse Practitioner Program and getting ready for the Boards. This means I’ve been spending less time focusing on fat related issues and more time diving into other areas of health. As result, I’ve had less time to focus on the blog. I do plan to get back into updating more regularly once the year is over.

However, the past couple of weeks has had several developments that are too note worthy to not mention! Starting in Australia:

ABC has an investigative show called Catalyst in Australia. Last week they aired a controversial report on saturated fat and cholesterol’s weak association with heart disease. This generated the obvious controversy…but the show followed it up with an episode about statins that generated even more controversy!

The basic premise of this episode was the overprescription of statins based off faulty guidelines and research on primary prevention groups (this is important to keep in mind). In addition to the literature on statins and heart disease, the show also covers some of the research process/designs when drug trials are conducted that can lead to flawed conclusions.

The expected controversy even lead the Australian Advisory Committee to urge ABC to pull the episode from airing since they believed it could have lead people to stop taking their medications – leading to death. Today Dr. Kerryn Phelps, a former Australian Medical Association president, added to the controversy by writing:

Screen Shot 2013-11-01 at 12.33.06 PM

Both episodes are worth a look to understand what the discussion is all about as many people are probably going to be confused with all this conflicting advice.

Moving onto Italy:

Apparently Pasta consumption has dropped 23% in the past decade. Why is this?

Worried about its fattening effects, she and her husband eat it no more than a few times a week, favoring couscous, meat and vegetables instead. “Metabolism changes when you approach 40,” she says, “and pasta is out of the question.”

The share of women between 26 and 30 years old who believe pasta is fattening increased 26% from 2008 to 2012, according to a Nielsen survey. And among 26- to 30-year-old men, the number who think pasta makes people fat increased 16%.

Reminds me of this episode of Portlandia:

Now to Britain:

Looks like the amount of saturated fat that will be in Britain will be decreased and taken out of the food supply:

Almost half of the food manufacturing and retail industry has signed up to the Responsibility Deal Saturated Fat Reduction Pledge by agreeing to reduce the amount of saturated fat in our food and change their products to make them healthier.

Cutting the amount of saturated fat we eat by just fifteen per cent could prevent around 2,600 premature deaths every year from conditions such as cardiovascular disease, heart diseaseand stroke.

Check out the link to the story which details what companies are planning to do. Such as:

Nestlé – which will remove 3,800 tonnes of saturated fat from over a billion Kit Kat bars per year by reformulating the recipe

And whatever they end up replacing the saturated fat will make kit kats “healthier?” Sigh…

And in Sweden:

Apparently, “Sweden has become the first Western nation to develop national dietary guidelines that reject the popular low-fat diet dogma in favor of  low-carb high-fat nutrition advice.”

I’ve heard in the past that a huge portion of the population in Sweden follows a Low Carb High Fat diet so this is not too surprising.

We’ll end with China

I’ve covered in the past how asians are often used in popular press to demonstrate how carbohydrates cannot be fattening since Asians are so skinny…despite being healthy and skinny not being the same thing.

Apparently a new study was released last month showing increased carbohydrate consumption being tied to coronary heart disease in the Chinese.

I won’t get into too much about this particular study since it’s observational and relies on questionnaires – which have faults in generating conclusive evidence. However, these study designs were used in the past to demonize dietary fat. So even if this study is not conclusive, it’s worth noting since it produced different results using similar methods in the past. Some notable observations:

These associations were robust and independent of several known CHD risk factors, including socio economic status, centralobesity, smokingstatus, hypertension, and saturated fat intake.

In a Japanese cohort, the average intakes of raw white rice were 170 g/day in women and 180 g/day in men. In that study, white rice intake was found to be inversely associated with death from cardiovascular disease in men but not in women (49). The reasons for the apparent conflicting results between that study and ours are not clear.

Advertisements